February 23rd, 2006

I want to sink slowly without getting wet

Apostropher, God of the Weird, points out a new technology

This is oh so cool.

Company researchers have come up with a way to process a common polymer so that it repels fluid, even drops of honey roll right off. The resulting property is called “superhydrophobicity” — or extreme repelling of water-based fluids — beyond even that of a freshly waxed car. While several existing engineered materials behave this way, the GE accomplishment is noteworthy because it was done with an inexpensive plastic, GE’s Lexan, that’s normally “hydrophilic,” meaning water spreads out on contact, not something that’s “hydrophobic” to start with, such as Teflon or silicone-based materials. These latter materials are far more expensive compared with Lexan, a ubiquitous thermoplastic used in products ranging from CDs and DVDs to automotive headlamps, food storage containers, and common household appliances.

I can see some really cool applications. Anything that is made of laminate or plastic? It’s could be a lot easier to clean (and a lot more slippery). Hell, maybe this is what ice is made out of.


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Turns out one is the loneliest number.

It’s not you, it’s you.

Research indicates that prolactin increases following orgasm are involved in a feedback loop that serves to decrease arousal through inhibitory central dopaminergic and probably peripheral processes. The magnitude of post-orgasmic prolactin increase is thus a neurohormonal index of sexual satiety. Using data from three studies of men and women engaging in masturbation or penile–vaginal intercourse to orgasm in the laboratory, we report that for both sexes (adjusted for prolactin changes in a non-sexual control condition), the magnitude of prolactin increase following intercourse is 400% greater than that following masturbation. The results are interpreted as an indication of intercourse being more physiologically satisfying than masturbation, and discussed in light of prior research reporting greater physiological and psychological benefits associated with coitus than with any other sexual activities.

And the Register has my new favorite euhpemism. Also note The Reg’s headline, which makes it seem as though both are bad things. I would change “worse than” to “not as great as.” But that’s just me.

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Warning: Infrequent drinking may be bad for your health. And your dignity.

We know that drunk people are less likely to injure themselves because they don’t tense their bodies before they hit something (like a floor). Now The Register points us to this study.

Admissions to the emergency department at Laussanne University Hospital over an 18-month period from pool cue related mishaps and the like were much more frequent amongst less committed schnapps bingers. The pattern was the same for both men and women.


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