Notes

We were so involved in ourselves

And so inclined to just look at the details

We saw in the big picture what was really the negative – a valley where we saw mountains, a desert for the sea, a sword for the plowshare

Viewed from another angle, another perspective…

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We’re not sentimental we’re just oil filled machines

Via Slashdot: This is incredible.

More here.


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Whether far or soon

As a freshman in high school, we read A Separate Peace. One of the few lessons I learned from that book is that separate is spelled with one E and two A’s. Pretty sure everyone in the class fucked that one up on the essay despite it being open book (yeah, I know…). Nobody got higher than a B+.

It’s been one of those days. Sliced my finger on a can top. First time ever. Growing up, I was always told that they’re so sharp, but it never happened. I’m trying to clean the kitchen tonight, and oops. Maybe it’ll leave a cool scar. I could use a few more scars… I’m a glutton for pain.


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The bark was stronger than the bite

Driving home last night, I thought of this poem. Late nights and headlights will do that to you:

Woof, woof
What’s that you say girl?
Jimmy’s stuck in the well?
Woof, woof, woof

Back to the farm
We’ll get some rope
And lower Lassie down
To keep Jimmy company.


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Master of Puppets

Via Tom:

A creepy, but somehow touching, tribute to Jim Henson. I think.

New House tonight (8pm on Fox). Hopefully I get home in time for it, as I missed Grey’s last night.


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Post Title Omitted. Deal with it.

Jorge Borges has an intriguiging method of shortening his stories. Instead of going into detail about incidents of seemingly significant import to the story, he merely glosses over them. Brilliance I say! An omniscient narrator leaving out pieces of the narration as if they are of no consequence! How dare we trust him like that! How dare we assume that the narrator knows better than we do what is important!

Yeah, I got nothing.

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This is my tribute to Odysseus.

Now I’ve got recent comments (right sidebar). So now, when nobody leaves a comment, you’ll be able to get right to nobody’s comment.

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More than yesterday…

So I wanted to post an article/paper I had written on software patents. I had written this paper as an assignment for my senior year class of Information Technology and the Law. All I could find, unfortunately, was a draft version missing the last two sections of my analysis and the conclusion. Part of the reason I wanted to post this was to edit it. Maybe I’ll create a wiki and let other people edit it. But until I find the rest of it (which may require returning to Florida and getting the original printed version with comments from the (I think) TA), I’ll just post a link to this story about the CrackBerry and its patent troubles with NTP. This makes RIM seem a lot less like they are the ones being cheated here*.

*This is interesting, especially since The G&M is a Canadian paper, RIM is a Canadian company, and NTP is an American patent holding company.



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Congress!

I ran into E and K at the top of the hill. I asked them where they were going, because, after all, I was new in town. They told me they were off to Congress, but they didn’t tell me what it was. They were dressed in their business attire, but as we walked down the hill, their pace quickened. E ran down an alley, and K began to run around the building. We arrived at the bar, and they were at the end of the line. I was going to continue on, but the linecheck lady called me back. I asked what Congress was. “It’s listening,” she said. Listening to what? “Just listening.”Ah, got it.

So the interesting thing was that Congress was a real life example of collaborative art in the real world. The Web 2.0 web right now is all about collaboration, but it all exists in a relatively static medium: you can always change something once you find it. At Congress, you could only change things as they happened. Think of it as a collaborative coffee house, only instead of coffee it was a bar. Anyhow, I thought it was a cool idea. Collaborative beerhaus.


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Storyboarding

In 2002, I took a course in computer animation. For the final project, the class was split into two groups to create a minute and a half long animation. A minute and a half, you think, is nothing. 90 seconds? You can’t even tell a story in 90 seconds! You think that, and then you realize that your story doesn’t have to be all that complicated (it’s actually better if they aren’t I think). In fact, the two groups had pretty similar storylines if you remove the characters: a rising action, a death, and artistic shot. of course, my group did a whole lot better. Anyow, it’s not an easy process: you have to come up with a basic story, then story board the whole thing. Then you throw that all out, and start over.

We bickered for a day about whether there could be death in our movie. Animation, some said, is for the kids. The rest of us? We thought that it was quite alright. After all, nobody expects the hero to unexpectedly die.

So anyhow, two points to this rambling post.

  1. I just watched it again. It’s better than I remembered.
  2. I’m surprised nobody has created a cooperative wiki-style storyboarding application. Just saying.


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